A jury trial involves highly complex issues of fact and law.  It involves highly skilled lawyers to present a case to a jury or a judge (in a bench trial) in order to secure a verdict.  No jury trial is ever alike and they are unpredictable.

VOIRE DIRE – This is jury selection where the attorneys select a jury.  The term “Jury Selection” can be a misnomer because the lawyers do not actually select a jury, but rather take certain members of the jury out of the pool.  This method of voire dire is called Peremptory Challenges.  This phase of trial is the most important part of a trial.

OPENING STATEMENTS – This phase of trial gives the lawyer an opportunity to begin the presentation of the case.  Juries will often make their decisions during opening statements.

DIRECT EXAMINATION – Lawyers can call witnesses to court on their side and can ask them questions to present their case to the jury through human testimony.  Within highly complicated legal rules and dynamics, the attorney may ask your witnesses questions.

CROSS EXAMINATION – After the other side’s lawyer asks their witnesses questions, the opposing attorney now has a chance to ask questions to contradict their statements or simply to present the case through their own witnesses by asking them questions and holding them accountable to their own statements.

CLOSING STATEMENTS – The presentation of evidence is now complete, and the lawyer has a chance to finish the case with closing remarks.

JURY INSTRUCTIONS – The judge will read jury instructions to the jury and then the jury will make a decision within set parameters.

VERDICT – At the end of a jury trial, the jury will offer a verdict binding upon both the Plaintiff and the Defendant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Note:  DO NOT CONSTRUE ANY OF THE MATERIALS HEREIN, OR WITHIN THIS WEBSITE AS LEGAL ADVICE.  IT IS FOR INFORMATIONAL/MARKETING PURPOSES ONLY]